What Are the Common Symptoms of Blocked Arteries

Symptoms of blocked arteries

Bone marrow is the cause of arteriosclerosis, which over time, begins with the breakdown of fats, minerals, cholesterol. Attached to your vascular wall. This structure forms a narrow opening of the artery, called the lumen, which is narrow and narrow. As a result, the heart will beat harder than it does in transfusing blood from a small vessel. It raises blood pressure and ensures extraction.

You may also find that different parts of your body start to suffer from lack of oxygen, especially if the arteries are blocked. Your symptoms depend on the location of the blockage and the part of your body that receives the least amount of blood.

Pain (angina).

You may have pressure or blockage in your heart, as if someone were standing in your heart. This pain, called angina, usually occurs between the heart or the left side. Angina is usually a physical or emotional stress. The pain usually goes away after a few minutes of stressful activity. In some people, especially women, the pain may be short or sharp and may affect the neck, arms or back.

Hardness in breathe

If your heart is not able to produce enough blood to meet your physical needs, you may experience extreme tiredness through breathing or exercise.

Heart attack

A completely blocked artery can lead to a heart attack. Signs and symptoms of a heart attack include pressure on your heart and pain in your  arm or shoulder, sometimes with shortness of breath and perspiration. Women are more likely than men to have well-defined symptoms as well as heart attacks, such as neck or shoulder pain. They can also cause other symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue and nausea.

Sometimes a heart attack occurs without any obvious signs or symptoms.
  • Angina (chest pain)
  • Pain in the upper body and arms, potentially concentrated on the left side
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Light-headedness
  • Indigestion
  • Jaw pain
  • Cold sweat
  • Unusual fatigue
Symptoms of nerve blockage

Bone marrow is the cause of arteriosclerosis, which over time, begins with the breakdown of fats, minerals, cholesterol. Attached to your vascular wall. This structure forms a narrow opening of the artery, called the lumen, which is narrow and narrow.

As a result, the heart will beat harder than it does in transfusing blood from a small vessel. It raises blood pressure and ensures extraction. You may also find that different parts of your body start to suffer from lack of oxygen, especially if the arteries are blocked. Your symptoms depend on the location of the blockage and the part of your body that receives the least amount of blood.

Warning signs of a closed artery

In some cases, nerves can cause severe symptoms and require emergency care. This usually occurs when the arteries are closed which supply blood to vital organs such as the brain or heart.

Signs of a medical emergency:
  • Asymmetric facial features, like a drooped smile
  • Sudden confusion or mental changes
  • Difficulty speaking or swallowing
  • Weakness, especially on one side of the body
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Vision changes
  • Chest pain
  • Sudden pain in the arm or back
  • Shortness of breath
  • A racing heartbeat
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
Risk Factors

Risk factors come together and are the trigger. For example, obesity can lead to type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. When combined, certain risks can increase your chances of developing coronary heart disease. For example, metabolic disorders – a cluster of conditions, including high blood pressure; High triglycerides; Low HDL, or “good” cholesterol; High insulin levels and high-fat diets increase the risk of coronary heart disease.

Risk factors for coronary heart disease include;

  • Age; Aging increases the risk of nerve damage and shrinkage.
  • Sex; Men are at higher risk for coronary heart disease. However, the risk for women increases after menopause.
  • Family history; Family history of heart disease is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, especially if a close relative has coronary heart disease at an early age. Your risk is higher if your father or sister was diagnosed with heart disease before the age of 55 or if your mother or sister developed it before the age of 65.
  • Smoking; Smokers have a higher risk of heart disease. Inhalation of cigarette smoke increases a person’s risk of developing coronary heart disease.
  • High blood pressure; Uncontrolled high blood pressure can make your arteries stronger and stronger, causing blood to flow from the arteries.
  • Cholesterol in the blood; High levels of cholesterol in your blood can increase the chances of developing plaques and atherosclerosis. High cholesterol lipoprotein (LDL) can lead to high cholesterol, known as “bad” cholesterol. Low levels of lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, known as “good” cholesterol, can also contribute to the development of atherosclerosis.
  • Diabetes; Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. Type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease share similar factors such as obesity and high blood pressure.
  • Overweight or obesity; Obesity is often associated with other risk factors.
  • Exercise; Lack of exercise and vascular disease for some reason.

High stress Uncontrolled stress in your life can damage your nerves as well as other things that can lead to neurological disease. Poor diet Eating a diet high in saturated fat, trans fats, salt and sugar can increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Sometimes nerve disease begins without any risk. Researchers studying other possible causes, including:

  • Can’t breathe in sleep. This problem causes you to stop breathing repeatedly while you are sleeping. Sudden fall in oxygen levels in the blood that occurs during sleep apnea raises blood pressure and pressure in the cardiovascular system, possibly leading to coronary heart disease.

Significant increase in reactive protein (hs-CRP). This protein is released much more than it does when there is inflammation in your body. High hs-CRP levels can be a risk factor for heart disease. The narrower the arteries are thought to be, the more hs-CRP will be in your bloodstream.

High triglycerides; It is a type of lipid in your blood. Elevated levels may increase the risk of coronary heart disease, especially in women.

Homocysteine; Homocysteine ​​is an amino acid that your body uses to build protein as well as build and repair tissues. But high homocysteine ​​levels can increase the risk of coronary heart disease.

Preeclampsia; This condition can cause high blood pressure and too much protein in the urine to grow in women during pregnancy. This can lead to a higher risk of heart disease later in life.

Drinking alcohol;  Overdrinking can lead to nerve damage. It can be exacerbated by other risk factors for vascular disease.

Autoimmune disease; People with conditions such as arthritis and lupus (as well as other inflammatory conditions) have a higher risk of atherosclerosis.

Other risk factors for blocked arteries may include:

  • Lack of exercise
  • Obesity
  • Genetic or family history of high cholesterol
  • Chronic infections
  • Diagnosis
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Diabetes
  • Heavy alcohol consumption
Diagnosis

Diagnosis of blocked arteries may begin with your primary care physician, but if an eye obstruction is being monitored, you are more likely to be referred to a cardiologist or neurologist. .

Much depends on who you see where the barrier lies and the problems it poses. For example, if you have a blockage in the nerves that feed your brain, you may also need to see a neurologist.

Your diagnosis will begin with a physical exam, as well as a review of your personal and family health history. Another test condition as well as the degree of resistance can be shown. Tests may include:

  1. Ultrasound
  2. Nuclear scans
  3. Blood pressure measurements
  4. Perfusion scans
  5. Computed tomography (CT) scan
  6. Blood tests

Muscle therapy

Muscle therapy should be performed thoroughly. Your doctor will first look at the problems that caused the nerve damage. Basic lifestyle changes may include:

  • Quit smoking
  • Dietary change
  • Regular exercise
  • Diabetes management
  • Blood pressure control
Frequently Asked Questions
What happens if you have blocked arteries?

If you have blocked arteries, the blood and oxygen it carries cannot reach all parts of your body. It can affect any part of your body.

Which food closes the arteries?

Foods such as fats and cholesterol and fast food can help in building memory and nerves.

What is the warning sign of a blocked artery?

There are several symptoms of nerve damage, including nausea and tingling, high blood pressure, cold hands, and skin.

How do they examine the nerves?

There are several tests to measure how it goes in your veins. Testing your blood pressure is the most harmful, but ultrasound, imaging studies, and cardiac catheters can provide accurate information to your healthcare team.

Can you open your nerves by nature?

It is difficult to get rid of muscle spasms, but you can help restore the memory structure by following a slow and perhaps healthy and low fat, nutritious diet.

When to see a doctor a doctor

If you think you may have a heart attack, call 911 or your local emergency number immediately. If you cannot get emergency medical services, get someone to drive you to a nearby hospital. Driving your car only as a last resort.

If you have an accident for coronary heart disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, tobacco use, diabetes, obesity – a strong family history of heart disease, talk to your doctor. Your doctor may want to test you for a neurological condition, especially if you have a seizure or seizure disorder.

Cardiovascular disease can lead to:
  • Pain (angina). When your coronary arteries become narrow, your heart cannot get enough blood when much is needed – especially during exercise. It can lead to heart attack (angina) or shortness of breath.
  • Heart attack If cholesterol buildup breaks in blood vessels, total arterial pressure can lead to heart attack. Not using blood in your heart can damage your arteries. The cost of destruction depends on how you get treatment quickly.
  • Heartbeat If certain parts of your heart are deprived of oxygen and nutrients due to prolonged bleeding, or if your heart has damaged your heart, your heart may not be able to meet your body’s need for pumping blood. This condition is called a heart attack.
  • Abnormal heart rhythm (arrhythmia). Insufficient blood flow to the heart or physical damage can block the electrical impulses of your heart, leading to abnormal heartbeat.
Prevention

A lifestyle that helps in the treatment of vascular disease may help prevent this. A healthy lifestyle can help strengthen your nerves and clear out plaque. To improve your heart health, follow these tips:

  • Quit smoking
  • Control conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.
  • Keep exercising.
  • Eat low-fat, low-salt foods with fruits, vegetables and grains.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Reduce and manage stress.
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