Woke Up With Hand Pains | Causes & Treatments

Woke Up With Hand Pains | Causes & Treatments

Anatomy of the hand

The hand is composed of many different bones, muscles, and ligaments that allow for a large amount of movement and dexterity. There are 3 major types of bones in the hand itself, including:

Anatomy of  the hand

  • Phalanges. The 14 bones that are found in the fingers of each hand and also in the toes of each foot. Each finger has 3 phalanges (the distal, middle, and proximal); the thumb only has 2.
  • Metacarpal bones. The 5 bones that compose the middle part of the hand.
  • Carpal bones. The 8 bones that create the wrist. The carpal bones are connected to 2 bones of the arm, the ulnar bone and the radius bone.

 

Numerous muscles, ligaments, and sheaths can be found within the hand. The muscles are the structures that can contract, allowing movement of the bones in the hand. The ligaments are fibrous tissues that help bind together the joints in the hand. The sheaths are tubular structures that surround part of the fingers.

 

Hand pain can happen for many reasons, from accidents to conditions that are ongoing. It can often be treated so that your symptoms ease up.

This article looks at some of the most common causes  and treatments of hand pain.

 

What does hand pain indicate?

Arthritis (the inflammation of one or more joints) is the leading cause of hand pain. It can occur anywhere in the body but is particularly common in the hands and wrist. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis, but the most common are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

When should I be concerned about hand pain?

 

Pain, swelling, or hand/wrist function is getting worse rather than better. You have signs of infection (redness, heat, fever, or chills) You experience tingling or numbness regularly in your hands. Normal, everyday activities are causing pain or are becoming increasingly difficult.

Can heart problems cause hand pain?

The chest pain of a heart attack can spread, or radiate, down one or both arms and to the shoulders. This often happens, and the pain may even extend to the wrist and fingers.

Which disease symptoms is hand pain?

Hand pain is one feature of joint inflammation (arthritis) that may be felt in the hand. Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are the two most common types of arthritis in the hand. Repetitive motion injuries, including carpal tunnel syndrome, can cause pain in the wrist and hand.

Cases Of Hand Pains

  • Sleeping positions

Consider changing your sleeping position for better sleep This can also cause back strain and uncomfortable pressure on your joints.

 

  • Bad mattress

If poor sleeping posture isn’t the cause of your hand pain, it could very well be your mattress. Switching out your old mattresses for a new one can greatly improve your sleep.

According to a 2009 studyTrusted Source, switching out mattresses older than nine years for newer ones can improve sleep quality, reduce back discomfort, and reduce stress symptoms.

Before choosing your next mattress, don’t be afraid to ask for professional recommendations.

 

  • Pregnancy

Hand pain during pregnancy is extremely common. Some women may experience this pain as early as 8 weeks into their pregnancy, but it’s most likely to become a problem between the fifth and seventh month.

Pregnancy can cause strain on lowerhand muscles. After sleeping for a long period of time, this hand pain can be worse in the morning, causing prolonged stiffness and muscle tightness.

To reduce pain and discomfort, try stretching up rather than putting pressure on your Hand. If your pain persists, a warm compress may help alleviate discomfort.

 

  • Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a disorder that causes widespread musculoskeletal pain. It’s believed that fibromyalgia amplifies pain by affecting how your brain processes pain signals. Though anyone is susceptible to fibromyalgia, it’s more common in women than in men.

 

Treatments Of Hand Pains

There are certain treatments a person can use at home to soothe arthritis pain in the wrists, fingers, and thumbs, including :
  1. using topical NSAID gels.
  2. applying hot or cold packs to affected areas.
  3. NSAID oral medication.
  4. using a paraffin wax bath, which coats the hand in wax as a form of heat therapy.
  5. exercising.

 

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